Assault with Intent to Rob

Understanding the Charge

Have you been charged with assault with intent to rob? Are you unsure of what to do and curious as to what this means? A conviction for assault with intent to rob could mean a serious prison sentence--up to ten years in the state prison or up to twenty years if you were armed with a dangerous weapon. Here is some information that you might want to know about this crime:

The statute that governs assault with intent to rob is Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 265 Section 20. Under that law, the prosecutor is required to prove two elements beyond a reasonable doubt in order to convict you. First, she has to prove that you assaulted someone else with violence or force. The force has to be enough to cause a reasonable fear of bodily injury, but the prosecutor does not have to prove that you actually touched the other person. Second, she has to prove that you intended to rob or steal.

If you have been charged with assault with intent to rob while armed with a dangerous weapon, you are facing a more severe punishment. Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 265 Section 18B is the statute that prohibits assault with intent to rob while armed with a dangerous weapon. To convict you of this crime, the prosecutor has to prove three things beyond a reasonable doubt. First, she has to prove that you committed an assault. Next, she has to prove that you were armed with a dangerous weapon. This means that you were armed with a weapon designed to produce death or serious bodily harm or one that could cause serious bodily harm because of the way it was used. Finally, the prosecutor has to prove that at the time of the assault, you had the specific intent to rob.

If you have been charged with assault with intent to rob, contact Francis T. O'Brien Jr. of O'Brien Law Boston. Attorney O'Brien is a well-respected expert in criminal law. In his 20 years of experience, he has gained an unmatched skill in criminal defense and a reputation for excellence.

Speak with a Boston Criminal Defense Lawyer Now 617-512-0939

To speak with a highly-experienced Boston defense attorney, click here, or telephone Francis T. O'Brien, Jr. at O'Brien Law Boston twenty four hours, seven days a week, toll free at 617-512-0939. There is no fee charged to discuss your case, and all information furnished will be kept strictly confidential.